The Highs and Lows of Endurance Training

The Highs and Lows of Endurance Training
5th April 2018 FUEL10K
In Interview

John Brame. Business owner, Sports Coach and Professional Athlete, has found time in his manic schedule to train for an ultimate endurance challenge in memory of his brother, Paul Brame. We have been following the highs and the lows during his training over the last couple of months and checked in with John ahead of his first endurance event.

You’ve been training for a strenuous couple of weeks, you’re taking part on four endurance races;  Paris Roubaix (180 km cycle) on Saturday 7th, the Paris Marathon on the 8th, Amstel Gold (240km cycle) on the 15th and the London Marathon on the 22nd of April. What are your TOP TIPS for people training or endurance events?

1) Be realistic with your goals and objectives especially if you have to juggle training with work/life.

2) Plan your training and maybe speak to coach about periodisation so you maximise the time you have available. Structure and planning with help with injury prevention and the quite often under/over training problems that we often hear about.

3) Nutrition. Practise with your nutrition and pay very close attention to what you eat before, during and after training so you are giving yourself the best possible opportunity to perform to your potential.

4) Make sure you have tried and tested all your equipment ahead of the events. Don’t try anything new on race day as you don’t want to reason you don’t achieve to be because of your equipment when you’ve worked so hard on getting your body ready.

How is your training going?

Training has gone well. I have one week now to rest up and get myself mentally and physically ready for what should be the toughest weekend of the three. I’ve cycled thousands of kilometres in the last 7 weeks since I started my training videos and run hundreds and hundreds of kilometres, so I think I’m ready….

Any injury’s or setbacks in training? If so how have you dealt with these?

Fortunately, I’ve had no injuries to mention, but I’ve had my fair share of setbacks.

1) The British weather. The weather has made time on the bike very difficult and I’ve had to endure some long hours in rain, wind, freezing cold temperatures and a few in heavy snow!

2) The lack of time available to me. Running three businesses and travelling all over Europe for work doesn’t leave me with a lot of time to train. I’ve had to do long runs in the dark, squeeze as much training into weekends as I can and generally juggle my diary around to allow some training around what has been a heavy workload.

3) The mental challenges. Although I have been motivated to train because I am doing it in memory of my little brother, www.paulbramefoundation.com, his passing is still very raw and I still have many mornings where I feel like I am waking up from my worst ever nightmare and I just don’t want to get out of bed. I know the grieving process is not something you can control and although at times the training has been a form of therapy, on other times it has made training difficult indeed.

What does your weekly training schedule consist of  to ensure you are fit and ready to attack your 3 weeks of pure endurance?

I have had to squeeze a majority of my training into weekends, but where possible I have squeezed sessions into the weekdays. Over the last 7-8 weeks my weeks training has looked like this…

Monday – Evening structured run session 10-15km

Tuesday – Day off usually travelling with work

Wednesday – Long run very early morning before work 20-35km

Thursday – Evening swim session 3km

Friday – Day off ahead of the weekend

Saturday – Long run with structure 15-25km (if not working)

Sunday – Long ride from home 90-120km (if not working)

Diet is a massive factor when you have a strict training schedule. What breakfast gets your refuelled for busy working day after a morning training session?

I start every morning with a FUEL 10K porridge pot or your Granola, this sets me up for the day and gives me the best possible start and energy I need. Lunch and dinner tend to be less structured as I work during the day and many evenings so I fit in food when time allows. I like plain, simple meals that are healthy and give me the fat, carbohydrates and protein my body needs to keep me working and training. Like with my training, my diet isn’t ideal but juggling a crazy work schedule and fitting in all this training I make it work and I think the key is to start each day probably with a proper breakfast so, no matter what each day pans out like you are starting from a solid base.

What’s your advice for get ready endurance events as a whole?

1) Be realistic with your goals and objectives especially if you have to juggle training with work/life.

2) Plan your training and maybe speak to coach about periodisation so you maximise the time you have available. Structure and planning with help with injury prevention and the quite often under/over training problems that we often hear about.

3) Nutrition. Practise with your nutrition and pay very close attention to what you eat before, during and after training so you are giving yourself the best possible opportunity to perform to your potential and repair muscle.

4) Make sure you have tried and tested all your equipment ahead of the events. Don’t try anything new on race day as you don’t want the reason you don’t achieve to be because of your equipment when you’ve worked so hard on getting your body ready.

Follow his journey @FUEL10k or @JohnBrame for news and updates. (John’s Sponsorship Page)

www.paulbramefoundation.com/